MUSIC MONDAY: Lupang Hinirang by Joey Ayala

I love our National Anthem, and that’s not because I work for the government.  I sincerely love it. The lyrics are so romantic and so well imagined.  When you read it, it sounds so hopeful and optimistic, the very same spirit that stirred revolutionaries.

So it doesn’t make sense to me why it’s sang as a march.

Joey Ayala was right; we, as a people, are very melodramatic.  We have had our fair share of struggles — from colonization to natural disasters — and we have emerged, although quite scarred and traumatized, alive and victorious.  All these struggles is not something you march to.

I didn’t even know that TED Talks are hosted here till I started with graduate school in 2012.  This is a happy revelation.  If it weren’t for these forums, I don’t know where else this new ballad would be debuted.

20150615 Lupang Hinirang

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Now I can only pray that the authorities won’t put him to jail for this.

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S/HE SAID: Pretense into an art form

20150404 Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We teach girls shame. “Close your legs. Cover yourself.” We make them feel as though being born female they’re already guilty of something. And so, girls grow up to be women who cannot say they have desire. They grow up to be women who silence themselves. They grow up to be women who cannot say what they truly think. And they grow up — and this is the worst thing we do to girls — they grow up to be women who have turned pretense into an art form.

— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, TEDxEuston